J I N hyun Jeon

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Sensory Appetizer

TSA Sensory Dining Tool

 

To show what we take for granted, and also perhaps, take for granted when designing is proposed. We design for our senses, but do we actually use our senses in the process? 

How much our senses come into play with every bite we take? This simple gesture, a bite, is actually a series of sensorial experiences. When we see the food we are using our sight, when we cut the food or prod it with a fork, we hear the consistency of the food, when the food comes closer to our face, we smell it, and through putting it in our mouth we both feel and taste it. This experiments lead me to the conclusion where I question the role of the tools with which we eat and how they should be designed. What I propose is that the tableware we use for eating should not just be a tool for placing food in our mouth, but that it should become a sensorial appetizer, teasing our senses in the moment when the food is still on its way to being consumed. Rather than being designed from a cultural point of view, or in regards to function and the specific food, I propose that tableware should be designed to suit our intuitive and mostly subconscious sensorial abilities rather than forcing the people to adapt to the tools.